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What Would You Consider to Be Poor?

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I quite often class myself as “poor”, because my personal income each month is £600 and all of my outgoings before food are £600. My partner is on minimum wage but works full time, so he contributes otherwise I wouldn’t be able to afford to eat. However, I own my own house (in Scotland so it was very cheap) and I have money in savings.. in the grand scheme of things, I’m probably not poor because of investments like my house, but each month I struggle to survive and have no excess money.. What would you class as poor?

sarahgreen15
12 months ago
What do you think of this?
MrsCraig
MrsCraig12 months ago

For me poor is when you struggle to meet your basic needs. Food, shelter, heat are basic needs to me, so if you struggle to pay for these then I would say you are poor.

I also live in Scotland. Whilst I wouldn't say that houses in Scotland are very cheap (it obviously depends on where you are buying them) it is cheaper than other countries.

I don't have a permanent contract and instead work on supply so any money I earn is seen as added bonus to us. We can survive on my husbands wages and save money as he has a good wage and we are careful with money, if I was to survive on my own then I would be poor!

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sarahgreen15
sarahgreen15
Original Poster
12 months ago

I think I notice the housing price because I’m originally from down south, where i‘m from, my exact house would be around £250,000.. in Scotland, it is £65,000... there is no way I could ever afford to buy a house down south by myself.. my partner doesnt earn enough to support us, so if I didn’t work we wouldn’t be able to afford our basic needs I don’t think..

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MrsCraig
MrsCraig12 months ago

sarahgreen15 that would make sense, our house down south would be about £275,000 so scotland is cheaper.

We recently had a change in circumstances as my maternity pay finished and my husband went down to half pay due to being off for 6 months because of our sons heart condition. We sat down and figured out how much our necessities cost and how we could reduce the cost of them and what were luxuries and we could cut out. It was hard but we managed on his reduced wage. It meant we didn't save any money and had to be a bit more careful and actually think more about what we bought. It is certainly hard to survive on one wage these days.

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CathSho13
CathSho1312 months ago

Poor is when you struggle to feed and dress yourself and your children. The ones that cant put the heating on when its cold and use candles to save on electric (worse still not having a home at all). Im not poor but im not rich, we might not have a bundle of spare cash at the end of the month but we have eaten, we are dressed in decent clean clothes, we have cars, a warm home with tv, internet and games etc.

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sarahgreen15
sarahgreen15
Original Poster
12 months ago

Based on that definition, I guess I would be on the cusp of poor.. we do have tv, internet, cars and clean clothes, but I wont put the heating on unless my dogs are cold - they have jumpers but if they are still cold, I will wrap them in blankets and will have to put the heating on.. I already am in debt to the gas company so I cant afford to put it on too often.. I have a bath / shower every 3 days, because I can’t afford the hot water, my partner has to shower everyday with a physical labour job.. I don’t buy any clothes or luxuries because I prioritise my dogs..

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RegularComper90
RegularComper9012 months ago

For me, I would say that you are considered as being poor when you begin to struggle to pay for the most basic of necessities, such as food, water, heat and a roof over your head.

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Johnny
Johnny12 months ago

I agree, but would add clothing to the list of basic necessities.

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sarahgreen15
sarahgreen15
Original Poster
12 months ago

I guess I am poor then 😂 I struggle to pay for heating, even with my partners wage.. luckily again, in Scotland we pay reduced water - with it being part of the council tax but the tax is the same price it would be down south.. if I had another £90 a month for water, I couldn’t afford to eat.. but because it’s so cold in Scotland, my heating bill is crazy and I owe them lots of money ☹️

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Lynibis
Lynibis12 months ago

I struggle to agree with many definitions of poor as I don't believe anyone who has cars (plural) with their associated costs, internet, gadgets etc can be considered poor. If anyone tells me they are hard up but manage to afford cigarettes, booze and foreign holidays I see red.

Most young families can get help with tax credits, child benefit etc (I am not up on these things) but when I was a child I had one pair of shoes and cardboard was placed inside when they wore through, toes cramped up. I had many birthdays without a card let alone a present, just sorry from parents. Many Sunday dinners comprised of a slice of bread with some Oxo gravy. My staple breakfast was a slice of fried bread and wonderful if we happened to have some form of ketchup or brown sauce to put on it. Every item of clothing I owned was second hand. Today I would have been taken into care but even at that age I knew I was not unloved or neglected, just poverty stricken.

As a young mum I was abandoned by husband with two sons to raise. He went to Australia and I did not get a penny so had to sell my home (it probably wouldn't happen today). I lived on credit and charity from friends and family and was not eligible for anything back then as I was working. Gradually I pulled myself up and out of poverty and today have my own home, car and enough to live comfortably. Both my sons are in well paid jobs and their families have never known what it is to go without.

That is my definition of poor but even so many were even worse off back then through no fault of their own. Today being dirt poor is often due to illness, addiction or downright shameful laziness.

Sorry if this post offends anyone but I lived through harsh times and I don't often hear of that type of poverty now except for the reasons stated.

(I have to add that the only benefit I have ever taken was child allowance).

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Pjran
Pjran12 months ago

Blimey you had a tough upbringing only hope your parents treasured and loved you.

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Lynibis
Lynibis12 months ago

Pjran it doesn't seem that way when living it, you just get on with it and only realise how bad it was when things improve. Call the Midwife portrays life in the 50s very well in the early series.

My parents were harsh and life was just different. There was not much kisses, cuddles and constant I love you like kids enjoy today. But then again harsh times begat harsh attitudes.

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Pjran
Pjran12 months ago

Watching the news last night had me in tears when families were being interviewed and didn’t have enough to eat. Now that’s poor. Count your lucky stars there’s always someone worse off than you and you have a loving partner to share your life with.

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SusanEaston327
SusanEaston32712 months ago

i class myself as poor i do have internet no car dont own a property do get buy with basic food have used food bank before however there are people worse off

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Lynibis
Lynibis12 months ago

Nowadays internet is becoming more of a necessity than a luxury as the government is very keen on us all being computer savvy. Used wisely it can save money which will help offset the cost of it.

Apart from being able to compare prices, you can look for deals on here and I save money by grocery shopping online. I am not tempted to buy things in the aisles, as I am instore, I just look for best price on things I need and buy bogofs if it is something I use.

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SaverDeals
SaverDeals12 months ago

I think poor is when you are at the maximum, barely getting by. So for example you are barely able to afford to get food and clothes and pay for your accommodation. If you miss out on activities, even little ones and yet start ll struggle to make ends meet.

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