1. Home
  2. Chat
  3. If You Have Side-Effects from Covid Jab, Are You Infectious to Others?

If You Have Side-Effects from Covid Jab, Are You Infectious to Others?

Ask a Question

Shout out to all the medical folks on here. If a person has side-effects from a Covid jab, can other people catch Covid from that person? Is the vaccinated-but-side-effecty person infectious?

kfe202
17 days ago
What do you think of this?
Leannexxx
Leannexxx16 days ago

The vaccine is not live so no you can't catch it but the person who has the vaccine can still get covid and still pass it on but they wouldn't be so ill with it

Like
Reply
3
kfe202
kfe202
Original Poster
16 days ago

You're so helpful and reassuring. Thank you for the information. I appreciate it and you.

Like
Reply
1
Imnotcheap
Imnotcheap16 days ago

The people I know who had it had no side effects except for sore arm

Like
Reply
kfe202
kfe202
Original Poster
16 days ago

That has not been our experience but I'm very glad that the people you know got away with so few side-effects.

Like
Reply
1
Mctash
Mctash3 days ago

🤣 arm it goes complety painfully dead sore

Like
Reply
Grannyclock
Grannyclock16 days ago

As I understand it, if you get side effects it is a sign that your immune system is working. You have not got covid so you can’t pass it on. Of course there is the outside chance that you have picked it up previously and it is just a coincidence. I had my jab on Saturday and was tired and achy but ok today.

Like
Reply
kfe202
kfe202
Original Poster
16 days ago

You're so kind. Glad to hear that you're okay now. Thank you for sharing your thoughts. I appreciate you.

Like
Reply
1
davidstockport
davidstockport16 days ago

That is correct, most side effects (usually just a sore arm or tiredness) are within a few days of having the jab, if a person had contracted Covid before having the jab* then that person would be able to infect other people.

*There is no check that a person might be asymptomatic before the jab is given - thinking about it; a person could come in contact with a carrier (possibly asymptomatic) on the way to get vaccinated, so there wouldn't be any point in checking it would take a few days to show up.

(not panic mongering just pointing out a very slight possibility)

Like
Reply
1
Mctash
Mctash3 days ago

kfe202 but you may have cov id with out nowing when you get vaccinated just so your not mislead the vaccination does not give you cov id but if postive test after meant you will have had prior

Like
Reply
Golfforall
Golfforall16 days ago

The jab absolutely doesn't give you an iota of covid . It is sterile , inert and has no covid elements in it whatsoever . Many millions of people worldwide have had the jab the majority with no side effects at all . The most commonly reported side effect is a "sore arm for a few hours "! .

Also side effects do not indicate whether the jab has "taken" , it will always "take" . We are learning everyday of the beneficial effects of the jab as data continues to be gathered. The most recent batch of data (from Israel who are way ahead of every other country in vaccination counts ) suggests the vaccine is far more effective than even the most optimistic projections .

What is important is that people watch these briefs on tele (one in about 30 minutes ) and try to understand what is being said (they do make it very understandable) . Then when someone tells you nonsense ( like your question hinted at) you can politely tell them to educate themselves before spouting such hogwash .

Like
Reply
1
davidstockport
davidstockport16 days ago

Not exactly hogwash - there is a very slight chance of contracting Covid from a person who is suffering side effects from the jab. But they would not have the virus (to pass on) because they had had the vaccination - they might have contracted it before they had the jab. (see my previous comment)

Like
Reply
1
Golfforall
Golfforall16 days ago

davidstockport That would only be in the miniscule chance of them having contracted the disease prior to receiving the vaccine or before it becoming effective.

I think it best not to confuse people by considering miniscule chances . The vaccine itself will only be 90% effective and it is still not certain whether it will prevent someone who has been vaccinated from still being a carrier .

I think I will continue to read the medical discussions and listen to the medical professionals and scientists . The vaccination is not a magic spell , we still need to take precautions but we can safely ignore (relatively speaking) all these scare stories based on very minute possibilities and coincidences .

As a nation we'll probably never be more than 90% protected from Covid (rather like Flu) but I think its unhelpful to confuse people with the miniscule "what ifs " .

Like
Reply
davidstockport
davidstockport16 days ago

Golfforall I have to disagree the chances of coming into contact with covid either when going to a place of vaccination or actually at the place are not MINISCULE, in my case the driver who took me for mine, had driven many others for theirs. Since self isolating last March he was the only person I had been in close proximity to for more than just a few seconds - and his vehicle was the only one I had been in. (fortunately all was well).

It was reported on Radio 4 that one of only two who have been hospitalised after being vaccinated, was vaccinated two days before hospitalisation, so must have contracted the virus before the jab.

When dealing with EXTREMELY infectious diseases no possibility (however slight) should be called HOGWASH.

Like
Reply
1
Golfforall
Golfforall16 days ago

davidstockport Its keeping things in proportion . I know someone who was run over by a bus . Therefore buses are dangerous (of course they can be if not treated with respect , as can all road vehicles !) .

To overstate the risks is HOGWASH and dangerous given the amount of misinformation doing the rounds aimed particularly at those more gullible .

Very surprised at you giving air to this misinformation ? I could write a dozen pages on the trial results and the results from Israel (where 70% of the population have been vaccinated ) but I'm sure you know how all the results are panning out .

Do me the courtesy of actually reading what I have posted ? Vaccination will only ever be 90% effective , there is still a chance of catching it from a vaccinated person (although it appears to be smaller) .

Do not give succour to the Anti Vaxers by confusing the issue . Read the question and don't try to blur the issue . The miniscule dangers of having the vaccine are much overstated in some quarters and I'm sure you are better than that ?

Like
Reply
davidstockport
davidstockport16 days ago

Golfforall I am NOT giving misinformation - I am correcting the misinformation that a person who has side effects from the vaccination, can not also have the virus (and transmit it to others). The vaccination to reduce that risk has little or no affect for a few weeks.

It is ignoring "possibilities" (however slight) that has already caused numerous deaths. I personally act towards others as if I am infected and as if they are infected, and will continue to do so for some time even though I have been vaccinated.

I worked in the main isolation hospital in Manchester (now demolished) in the late 1970s and am only too aware that ignoring any possibility of infection is extremely dangerous.

I will answer the final question asked by the OP accurately and honestly:

Q: "Is the vaccinated-but-side-effecty person infectious?"

A: They MIGHT be! (and many people will be infectious after the vaccination - but not because of the vaccination.)

I am not giving succour to the anti vaxxers - I am just stating a FACT which is that a person who is suffering any side-effects of the vaccination (usually only lasting a few days) is as likely to be as contagious as any other member of the population. (except those who had the vaccine a few weeks or more before).

Hope that clears things up.

Like
Reply
1
Golfforall
Golfforall15 days ago

davidstockport I think you are barking up the wrong tree with regards to the question (or maybe I am ?) .

Having side effects to the vaccine mean absolutely nothing in terms of infectiousness ,its just the different ways each of our bodies react to it .

Initial data appears to suggest that having had the vaccine makes us less infectious (as well as obviously protecting us from the virus ) . We know that the vaccine's protection only builds up after 2 or 3 weeks and that any side effects occur in the first few hours or days .

TBH it depends how you read the question ? Any side effects will occur shortly after the vaccination when you have not yet achieved protection anyway . So if you are not infected when receiving the vaccine any side effects will also not be infectious (the vaccine does not contain any live virus ) .

Maybe the confusion has arisen as many vaccines for other diseases (NOT the Covid vaccine) contain a minute amount of the "live" disease . These give us a little of the disease so our bodies produce antibodies to fight the disease . This is NOT the case with the Covid vaccination as it is sterile and contains no Covid whatsoever .

I'm out of this discussion as we appear to be at cross purposes with our understanding of the question . It is important that people are not confused by theoretical issues .

Covid will be around for a long time the important thing is to still be cautious about how we interact this summer . The vaccine is only going to be 90% -95% effective anyway and say we have an uptake of 80% there is still going to be a lot of it at large .

I shall now concentrate on explaining the actual facts , as I have done to date , as I consider it unhelpful to confuse the issue that many find difficult enough already to comprehend .

Like
Reply
davidstockport
davidstockport15 days ago

Golfforall You are attributing things others have said to me, and most of the time repeating what I have said.

Simple summing up of what I've said:

A person who is suffering side effects of the jab (usually within the first few days) is just as likely to be infected with Covid (not because of the jab) as any other person (except those who were vaccinated a few weeks or more previously).

So the chance of being infected by someone who is suffering side effects, is just as great as picking it up from a random stranger. NOT INSIGNIFICANT or MINISCULE. Everyone who has died has indirectly picked up the infection from someone else, some of them might have thought the risks were too small too.

A

Like
Reply
Mctash
Mctash3 days ago

davidstockport ow snap lol ss david i had not read all chat lol

Like
Reply
Stevo1283
Stevo128316 days ago

The odds of you ever picking up the virus from the vaccine are very very slim, in most cases vaccines are a weakened, dead or small part of the total virus that on its own cannot do any damage. In the case of the coronavirus i believe the part of the virus that you get injected with is the spikes on the edge of the virus ( this is in some of the vaccines but not all i believe ). I do believe the most common side effects are sore arm and maybe feeling a bit tired.

Hope this helps

Like
Reply
1
Golfforall
Golfforall15 days ago

You are correct with how many vaccines work (they in effect give you a little of the disease so your body learns to fight it ).

Absolutely NOT the case with the Covid vaccine . It is completely artificial and contains NO Covid elements whatsoever . I think this is perhaps where some of the confusion is coming from ?

Like
Reply
Leannexxx
Leannexxx15 days ago

Golfforall None of these vaccines can give you COVID-19. mRNA vaccines contain material from the virus that causes COVID-19 that gives our cells instructions for how to make a harmless protein that is unique to the virus. After our cells make copies of the protein, they destroy the genetic material from the vaccine.

Like
Reply
1
Golfforall
Golfforall15 days ago

Leannexxx Exactly . I think the misunderstanding arises because of how some vaccines used to work . The more people get to understand how it actually works perhaps the fewer people will have worries .

Like
Reply
1
Leannexxx
Leannexxx15 days ago

Golfforall I don't think so to be honest a lot of people think that its not been tested long enough and we really won't know how it will all pan out its to early to say

Like
Reply
1
BORDERJOE
BORDERJOE12 days ago

I had my jab yesterday and am currently feeling sorry for myself after a night with shivers and a bit of a headache ... hubby, who I WAS worried about, (he has a compromised immune system), has had no effects at all. Despite feeling pathetic at the moment, it's still a no-brainer compared to the risks from getting Covid so I'm just focusing on tomorrow. As for the passing on .... well we're going to continue taking all the precautions we were before.... be daft not to. The system was ultra efficient by the way and I came out feeling as tho I'd won the lottery!

Like
Reply
2
Leannexxx
Leannexxx12 days ago

My younger brother is having the vaccine tomorrow hes the youngest out of all of us and hes the only one who's been offered it

Like
Reply
davidstockport
davidstockport3 days ago

I think in most regions the age criteria has now been overtaken by the individuals vulnerabiliy, support workers and those vulnerable because of health problems seem to have precedence.

Like
Reply
One of the UK's largest deal hunting communities

Join for free to get genuine deals, money saving advice and help from our friendly community

Kelsey, Tom
& Deepak
Founders
Founders of Latest Deals
We use cookies (e.g. personalisation, analytics, social media). Find out more.