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Standing up for Teachers Entering the Room.

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Right or wrong? Those of you who have read many of my comments will know I am a stickler for discipline for children. I am convinced that much of today's ills are caused by lack of discipline. And this isn't just my opinion but from seeing the results of good discipline over the years.

I think it is respectful for children to be courteous and obedient and know the boundaries and airy fairy parents who have no control over their kids are abandoning their responsibilities.

The school that has implemented this is a winner in my book though I doubt anyone under 45 will agree.

Lynibis
14 days ago
What do you think of this?
MrsCraig
MrsCraig14 days ago

I make all my pupils line up at the door. They have to be in a neat, straight line before they are let in, anyone misbehaving is held back, spoken to and made to hand out everyone's jotters and all the other resources. Helps to teach them responsibility and consequences for their actions, teaches them manners and that their behaviour matters even before they step into the classroom and shows them that they are not in charge.

The pupils should not be in the classroom before the teacher. If a depute or head teacher walked into my class, then the pupils were made to say good morning or afternoon, so making them stand up when they walked in would be fine with me.

Ps I'm 29.

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Sanitation1234
Sanitation123414 days ago

Thanks my daughter wants to be a teacher I will show her this comment as a advice for her future πŸ™πŸ»πŸ˜Š

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MrsCraig
MrsCraig14 days ago

Sanitation1234 the best thing for her to do would be to try get some work experience in a school. I volunteered at a secondary school one day a week during my last year at uni. Gave me a chance to observe different classes, to actually teach some classes, plan lessons etc and meant I had some actual experience and examples to talk about when going for my interview to get into teacher training. Also gave me references, who were able to help me with writing my application. Also my uni had a careers section and they did mock interviews, I went to a few mock interviews, so I had an idea of the type of questions that might be asked, how to answer questions, how to act in the interview etc. All these thing really helped as I got into the course. If she is able to do any of those things, when the time comes, then I highly recommend she does them.

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Sanitation1234
Sanitation123414 days ago

MrsCraig Thanks so nice of you she used to go work experience but now she only goes 1 day in private School she got 2 years left to finish her course I don’t know all about never been to uni then she saying she will doing extra year yesterday she pass her half exam she was very happy 😊 take care I always read your comments very interesting πŸ™πŸ»

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MrsCraig
MrsCraig14 days ago

Sanitation1234 sounds like she is perfectly on track and knows what she needs to do. Congrats to her on passing her exam, she should be proud of herself.

Ah thanks 😊

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Sanitation1234
Sanitation123414 days ago

MrsCraig Thanks 😊Hi I just mention your name in question when ever you free give her advice please πŸ™πŸ»-( Childcare Job Interviews what to expect? )

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Lynibis
Lynibis
Original Poster
13 days ago

It is good to know that not all under 40s have abandoned the tried and tested way of raising children. I do not condone verbal or physical abuse of any kind but I do think children need to spend time learning to be courteous, respectful, patient and that the world does not revolve solely around them, that others have feelings too. Glad that you seem to have it where you teach.

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Caz2
Caz213 days ago

MrsCraig-How can you not spell deputy correctly if you teach?πŸ˜‚

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MrsCraig
MrsCraig13 days ago

Caz2 in my school, in Scotland, they are known as depute head teachers, so it is actually spelt correctly. Also whether you meant it to or not, your comment comes across as a little bit rude.

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MrsCraig
MrsCraig13 days ago

Lynibis I agree that you do not need to be physically or verbally abusive to discipline children. My pupils know where the line is and they know the consequences if they cross the line. The head of department is very supportive and any misbehaviour is dealt with straight away. Our school is very big on discipline.

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Lynibis
Lynibis
Original Poster
13 days ago

MrsCraig and Caz2. I am forever editing my posts due to predictive text and wrongly spelled words often creep into a comment but it doesn't mean a person cannot spell, it is more likely to be a typo.

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MrsCraig
MrsCraig13 days ago

Lynibis it isn't a typo though. In my school in Scotland, they are known as depute head teachers, so as I have already said, it is spelt correctly. It is a word we use in Scotland, if you google it, it even says depute in Scotland, so it is definitely correct. But I agree that auto correct does that to me too.

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Lynibis
Lynibis
Original Poster
13 days ago

MrsCraig hi I wasn't speaking particularly about your post as I had already read your explanation. I was clumsily trying to point out to the other lady what can happen as I felt her comment to you was a little harsh.

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MrsCraig
MrsCraig13 days ago

Lynibis I wasn't sure if you had read my explanation so thought I should explain again, just in case. Thank you, I felt her comment was a little rude. Also I used to have a teacher with dyslexia, he used to ask us sometimes how to spell words and he was the best teacher in the school!

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Caz2
Caz212 days ago

MrsCraig aw,didnt mean it harshly.we dont have that spelling in England,as its Scottish dialect.

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MrsCraig
MrsCraig11 days ago

Caz2 it came across as harsh, you can't always tell how someone means something when it is written down. I understand it is Scottish dialect and not used in England, so you aren't used to seeing it written that way.

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Caz2
Caz211 days ago

MrsCraig no im not at all,so im sorry.

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MrsCraig
MrsCraig11 days ago

Caz2 apology accepted.

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Ann1984
Ann198414 days ago

I agree children need strong discipline a local school not far from me is refusing to teach kids unless the lesson are recorded. When I was at school we had to line up until told to enter then it was boy girl boy girl at seats even school trips this helped so we were distracted by friends.

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Mango4
Mango414 days ago

Don't really see an issue with it , it is just a form of respect /good manners.

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hspexy
hspexy13 days ago

In most east asian countries, kids usually have to bow to the teacher at the beginning and end of classes, and they have a daily ritual of exercise and singing to the national anthem...I remember laughing at the idea of it as a kid when my mum told me about it as I have never had to do that in the uk

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Caz2
Caz213 days ago

Its a lot to do with upbringing definately, my kids were all brought up with good manners,as i was,and now theyre bringing up my grandkids with good manners too.None of mine ever hung round in yob groups on street corners growing up,and all had respect for teachers.

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AgnesFaludi
AgnesFaludi11 days ago

Yes, stand up and respect the teacher. They used to be role models....

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Caz2
Caz29 days ago

A lot has slipped.in colleges & uni tutors tell the students to call them by their christian names,but you know what they say 'familiarity breeds contempt'...

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Lynibis
Lynibis
Original Poster
9 days ago

Very much agree with you. Using a person's first name is a psychological way of putting you on an equal footing rather than being respectful. Being older I remember in my 20s and 30s being addressed as Mrs ***** but now, even being lots older people who phone or in banks etc who have never met me call me Lyn. I don't like it as it feels too familiar.

As soon as a child calls a teacher by his/her forename they consider themselves equal and respect goes out the door.

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Caz2
Caz27 days ago

Lynibis i know,i mean i can see why in uni,maybe they want to welcome students in,on a more equal footing,especially mature students,but still,i think its wrong,i mean,they are the ones in charge,the tutors,and if it was a place of work,you wouldnt expect to walk in & call your managing director by their first name would you, you'd call them mr or mrs or ms whatever,and in college definitely,and high school,definitely id expect them,as teenagers etc,to not use a christian name,as a mark of respect,show whose boss.

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MrsCraig
MrsCraig7 days ago

Caz2 our tutor at uni used to tell you off if you called him by his first name! It was all about respect.

We only call our head teacher by his first name if it is before or after the start of the school day and there are no pupils to hear. I am on maternity, but my sons bookbug class is in the library at the school where my husband teaches and where I taught. The pupils still call me Miss and I refer to my husband as Mr in front of them too.

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Caz2
Caz25 days ago

Yes this is the new uni,my son started last september,and the tutors say to call them by their first names.sign of the (modern) times i guessπŸ€”πŸ˜

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