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Coronavirus and the Elderly

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We all know about the Coronavirus but have you read the following?

Elderly people will be told to stay at home under new government guidelines to tackle the outbreak of deadly coronavirus as health officials urge Britons to check in on their relatives.

The elderly should be prepared for 'social distancing' policies, which are to be announcement by ministers next week, government sources said.

Advice will include the elderly staying at home and avoiding crowded areas which the Department of Health warned could leave people 'cut off'.

Guidelines also state that households should decide how their food will be delivered in case they have to self-isolate.

This is taken from the following link in the Daily Mail. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8085023/Vulnerable-people-confined-homes-WEEK-coronavirus.html

How can they tell people to stay at home. I know of older people who, if they can't get to the shops regularly, would starve (my father included, who doesn't keep stocks of food in his house).

It may be idealistic to keep them 'safe' at home but reality is nothing like the proposed guidelines are suggesting.

My own father lives 6 hours away from me and does not use the internet. He has no other relatives nearby either. What would they suggest he and millions like him do?

tumblespots
23 days ago
What do you think of this?
Lynibis
Lynibis23 days ago

The first thing I want to know is what do they consider elderly? My boss has a workforce of approximately a dozen and only about 4 are under 60. If we all stop working, despite government ruling, he could not afford to pay us as he would not be paid for the work we were not doing.

I think it is beholden on younger relatives to leave food packages outside front doors, delivered with gloves on. The payment arrangements could be worked out. I do online banking and would be able to pay my sons and grandchildren online. I would not need to as I do online shopping. In your case tumblespots can you do an online shop for your father as distance would be no obstacle to this?

I think temporarily supermarkets will need to begin using bags again so they can 'drop and run'.

To be honest, I wish I could just stay home and ride it out, I am happy with my books and tv, because I am more than a little worried working among children, carers, parents, contact centre staff. Going to the houses, the centre, in and out of a stuffy car touched by many and heating blaring. But, I do not want to let anyone down and am torn between risk of a serious, possibly fatal, illness or keep carrying on.

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
23 days ago

The disparity seems to be that the government are describing over 60's as elderly and vulnerable to corona virus but when it comes to state pension we are young and fit enough to work until over 66 years old! πŸ˜‚ πŸ˜‚

I could send shopping to my dad but he is a bit (bit!!!) of a cheapskate and if I didn't get it cheap enough for him he wouldn't accept the whole order! I have offered this before now - he is 93 and had a fall about 6 weeks ago and can't get out. His sister in law (late 80's) seems to be taking care of him, cooking, shopping etc but, of course, she is in the 'stay at home' bracket too!

Drop and run - brilliant, but I bet they will charge more than 5p per bag for the service (got to make a buck where you can!)

You seem to be working in a whole range of susceptible groups, I will admit that we are actively avoiding anyone with children, which thankfully at our age isn't too difficult. You really are between a rock and a hard place with your job though. If you feel unwell I assume you will leave them to fend for themselves and take care of yourself (please) πŸ’ 🐞

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davidstockport
davidstockport23 days ago

tumblespots The definition of "elderly" they use (over 60) is not very helpful - from what I've read it would appear that the risks to those over 60 are more dependent on the general health and lifestyle. But the older one is the less likely it is that general health will be as good.

It must be remembered that a doctor (Dr.Peng) was only 29 when he died from Covid-19, and probably knew more about viral infections than the rest of us put together. From what I've heard on radio, the fact he was a smoker didn't help him very much.

This might serve as a warning to any young'ns who think they're safe that it isn't just us old'ns who are at risk. (even though we're more at risk).

I wish people would stop referring to Covid-19 just as CoronaVirus. I've got a coronavirus at the moment it's just the common cold coronavirus. I HOPE!☺

Nevertheless anyone who wishes to drop off food parcels outside my front door are quite welcome to, A few cans of beer might help too. I've read that alcohol can kill viruses.☺

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Lynibis
Lynibis23 days ago

tumblespots ha ha the silly thing is I don't consider myself elderly and I bet your dad doesn't either. Was wondering if they might move in together before they are at risk? I think that is my biggest worry....living alone, but I have made my family promise to stay away even now but made son no. 1 promise to phone/text each morning and evening to check I haven't croaked it lol.

Oh, you have to laugh, but I am of the mindset that what will be, will be. No good sitting moping around during the end days prior to expiry date.... and no good moping around if I haven't yet reached my best before!!

I think my fatalistic attitude is from many years of registering deaths and knowing that no one ever thwarts the old guy with the scythe!!

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Lynibis
Lynibis23 days ago

davidstockport I was wondering why it had two names, just call me thick lol. You've cheered me right up.....29?!

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davidstockport
davidstockport23 days ago

Lynibis Yep 29 - that'll get all those complacent youngn's worrying, spread the word!

I'm already "locking out the world" because of my cold. I did have self imposed exile from the world from Christmas day morning until the 4th of January because of a mystery virus, don't ask me what the virus was. . . it's still a mystery.

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
23 days ago

Lynibis No, dad doesn't consider himself old. Since the fall he had his sister in law has moved in with him, she couldn't have taken care of him otherwise, as she lives 60 miles away from him. So they may well be stuck together for a while now. (What will the neighbours say!) I agree with que sera sera and have never worried about dying, as you say, nobody can avoid that scythe....Stay safe. 🐞

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
23 days ago

davidstockport I think there is another mutant strain now too called 'SARS-CoV-2' which sounds deadly as I believe sars on it's own is quite potent isn't it?

I think a persons susceptibility to the virus is also dependent upon underlying factors - does my bad back count? And you may not necessarily know if you have something that hasn't be diagnosed yet too..

Should we be dropping food parcels outside doors where we haven't seen anyone for a while, just in case they are ill and can't get out?

Let's hope you cold gets better soon. 🐞

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davidstockport
davidstockport23 days ago

tumblespots If you do decide to drop food parcels outside the houses of people you haven't seen for some time, may I suggest you open the letter box first - if hundreds of blue-bottles fly out you may be a little late.

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
22 days ago
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Caz2
Caz220 days ago

My son,(17 nxt mth) told me perfectly seriously that im in the 'elderly' category,and im only 56...😐

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Lynibis
Lynibis20 days ago

Caz2 lol, at that age they think everyone over 30 is old!

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Caz2
Caz220 days ago

Lynibis and im a 'young-looking' 56 at that...no,thats the thing,he's my youngest,and has older siblings,21 to 39) and he doesn't consider them old at all..πŸ€”( the young-looking thing runs in our family though)

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Caz2
Caz220 days ago

Caz2 im hoping hes just going by the statistics age categories😁

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
19 days ago

Caz2 Isn't it funny how our perceptions of age change as we get older. Mine asked me about his inheritance when he was 12 - clearly he thought I was fit to snuff it way back then?! 🐞

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Caz2
Caz219 days ago
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Johnny
Johnny11 days ago

davidstockport If the blue bottles flying out are Bombay Sapphire empties, it’s me, and I’m still alive. Please bring me more tonic!

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hspexy
hspexy23 days ago

I used to bump into an elderly gentleman in the Morrison’s near my old workplace a couple of times a week. He would always loiter in the aisles and just ask passersby where the milk was. The milk is always in the same place! However, if it weren’t for the interactions with strangers in the supermarket, he’d have no one to talk to. I’m sure that even with the risk of the Coronavirus, this person will risk it to save his own sanity

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
23 days ago

That is probably one of the largest causes of the spread of viruses. We had one in our morrisons too, he would show you his list and talk about things on it. The sad fact is that many old people are lonely. My dad at 93 is lonely but wouldn't move near to us, or move in with us and didn't want us to move nearer to him, now his situation probably couldn't be much worse. (I love him but he was wrong) There is no fool like an old fool.... All I can do is worry as I can't travel 🐞

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Sanitation1234
Sanitation123422 days ago

tumblespots Thanks for sharing this information I think this is safe for elderly people i hope your father will be ok if things goes worse you can bring them in your home if they want 😊i hope everthing will be ok soon πŸ˜ŠπŸ™πŸ»

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
22 days ago

Sanitation1234 My dad lives 6 hours away by car - on a good trip! 🐞

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Sanitation1234
Sanitation123422 days ago

tumblespots Oh that’s long journey then

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
22 days ago

Sanitation1234 I can't travel that far, (I have a deteriorating back condition) although Mr Tumblespots would travel to get him for me. We shall have to wait and see?! 🐞

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Sanitation1234
Sanitation123422 days ago

tumblespots very sad to hear your deteriorating back condition . I hope everything will be ok soon I can understand your feelings for your father May God protect him from this Coronavirus πŸ™πŸ»πŸ˜Š

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
22 days ago

Sanitation1234 Thank you πŸ’ 🐞

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Caz2
Caz220 days ago

tumblespots oh i would send mr Tumblespots to go get him i think...πŸ€”

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
19 days ago

Caz2 It may come to that, but I spoke to him yesterday and he seems ok and don't forget he is extremely stubborn. 🐞

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Caz2
Caz211 days ago

tumblespots ALL men are extremely stubbornπŸ˜‚

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PhilipMarc
PhilipMarc21 days ago
  1. Try to avoid crowded areas.
  2. Have wipes.
  3. Maybe a face mask.
  4. Wash your hands.

Don't feed into the hysteria that the media has created.

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Lynibis
Lynibis21 days ago

Try telling that to the Italians. Face masks are proven to be useless and washing your hands is fine until 3 minutes later you touch a contaminated surface. If you could avoid crowds then just stay home, most people can't as they have to work.

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
21 days ago

Lynibis I agree, within a minute most people have usually touched something, even their own faces, and need to wash their hands again, it really isn't practical. Perhaps we all need to wear gloves? But then they would get dirty too. Where am I going with this??

For those who work, as you say, they have no choice and probably feel more vulnerable. Bugs are always passed on, we just need to try and reduce the risks each of us takes. 🐞

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Caz2
Caz220 days ago

Lynibis i went to venice in october last year,i got home and their flooding started,now poor beggars have this!- when i went to cyprus a few yrs back they got their first rain in over 2 yrs! Im beginning to feel like a flipping jinx! πŸ˜₯

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Dennab
Dennab20 days ago

This very topic is feeding the hysteria, not that I'm saying that was intentional tumblespots.

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
19 days ago

Dennab The thing is, if you ban people from talking about it they will imagine all sorts of things far worse that it actually it?! 🐞

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
19 days ago

Caz2 I think you are going to have to declare to the world where you are going in advance so that we can all watch whichever country it is with interest! 🐞

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Caz2
Caz219 days ago
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Caz2
Caz219 days ago

Lynibis a view of where we were in october,in st.marks square,was completely empty of people when my son showed me earlier.

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Johnny
Johnny21 days ago

Hi tumblespots

Public Health England (PHE) suggested people may need to get supplies for loved ones if social-distancing measures are brought in and more people are told to stay at home.

The posts urged people to β€œplan ahead”, adding: β€œEveryone has a part to play, and we’re asking people to think about what they do in a typical week, how they could limit contact with others if asked to, and how they could help people in their community who might need support if certain social-distancing measures were put in place.

β€œThis might include helping older relatives and neighbours to get some food in, so that they would have supplies for a week or so if required, ensuring someone would be available to go shopping for them, or arranging for online delivery if they needed it.”

Your father won't starve. He's got you to keep an eye on him, to order online, and to make sure the food parcels arrive!

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
21 days ago

He is a bit of an eccentric though and if he thinks I have spent too much (in his eyes) I fear he is fool enough to not accept the delivery despite the fact that he really does shop from week to week (or at least his sister in law is doing it for him now, following the fall) he doesn't ever have food reserves.

The opposite side of that coin is that if hoards of people are all getting extra food (for relatives) when they are shopping it then looks like they are going to be hoarding, nobody knows why they are getting so much in one go do they? Is it just for themselves, or not? 🐞

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Caz2
Caz220 days ago

Problem is online shopping deliveries WON'T just leave shopping and go- (i found that out when i was going to be late back for a delivery- and how would they? They can't leave their plastic delivery crates and they have stopped using bags altogether! ( which is stupid cause if you go store& forget a bag,they're still willing to sell you some.) I think the abolishment of the bags on food is a way to spread germs/bugs anywayπŸ€”πŸ˜‘

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Lynibis
Lynibis20 days ago

Caz2 I was thinking just during the crisis though. They have your phone number and can ring to say they are at your door then wait a few feet away until they see you open and start taking it in.

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Johnny
Johnny20 days ago

Lynibis Yes, the supermarkets will need to develop a new system so that recipients don’t need to sign for delivery just be seen to receive the goods. Obviously they shouldn’t touch anything the driver needs to touch so deliveries will have to be in non returnable boxes or bags.

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
19 days ago

Caz2 Yes, I don't like buy vegetables (that you don't peel before use) that aren't in bags - you never know who has coughed on them at the best of times... 🐞

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
19 days ago

Lynibis The only flaw with that, that I can think of immediately, is that if you are feeling unwell it could take you some time to ferry all the food into your house/property and the drivers don't usually have a large time slot in which to deliver? 🐞

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
19 days ago

Johnny I am pretty sure that the last time I had a delivery, admittedly a while ago now, I didn't have to sign and didn't get any paperwork either!? I wasn't impressed at the time but it could be beneficial now. 🐞

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Lynibis
Lynibis19 days ago

tumblespots before the virus and before the ban on plastic bags, I would stand at the door and just take the goods from the driver and stack in hall, sign and off he went. I then unpacked at my leisure and returned the bags next time.

The driver, now, need only make sure you are in with the call first, wait to see you open the door and then scoot, it wouldn't really be down to them to do anything further without putting themselves in danger.

Johnny Dr Hilary spoke the other day of the virus being unable to live on paper/cardboard so maybe supermarkets could deliver in their smaller boxes as they must have loads. Oh and for those following the sanitizer thread, he also gave that recipe out again this morning lol.

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tumblespots
tumblespots
Original Poster
19 days ago

Lynibis Yes, it surely can't be too much like rocket science to do that, perhaps they will work it out in time. 🐞

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Johnny
Johnny19 days ago

Hi Lynibis

...Dr Hilary spoke the other day of the virus being unable to live on paper/cardboard...

I didn't see the programme with Dr Hilary, but the World Health Organization has this to say:

How long does the virus survive on surfaces?

It is not certain how long the virus that causes COVID-19 survives on surfaces, but it seems to behave like other coronaviruses. Studies suggest that coronaviruses (including preliminary information on the COVID-19 virus) may persist on surfaces for a few hours or up to several days. This may vary under different conditions (e.g. type of surface, temperature or humidity of the environment). Source: https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses

I wonder whether Dr Hilary meant the virus won't survive on paper or cardboard for very long, or not at all? I suspect it's the former.

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Lynibis
Lynibis19 days ago

Johnny yes definitely the former as he said quite specifically that it cannot survive on tissues, but of course it has to have some sort of lifespan. The trouble is, we are getting conflicting advice and facts from even reputable sources who probably feel they should say something rather than nothing. Washing hands is good advice but if you touch a contaminated surface 2 minutes later..........?

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Caz2
Caz212 days ago

Johnny apparently they put them in (free) bags for you,and put them on doorstep& ring bell or knock.then leave.( its all on info emails)

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