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Regional Slang

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My other half is from surrey. I am born and bred in greater manchester, I didn't realize how many things we sayvthat is a northern thing. For example a brew = cup of tea. I say breakfast dinner tea. He says breakfast lunch dinner. Does anyone else know of any regional sayings or phrases?

joannecroston
4 months ago
What do you think of this?
Dilligaf
Dilligaf4 months ago

I'm a southerner now living in the East Midlands and it's like listening to a completely different language some days. I won't get in the circular piece of bread debate as that goes on forever but a few things I have picked up since being here:

Toofies - sweets

Snap - lunch

Are you going to mash? - Are you making a tea?

I'm washing the pots? - Washing any form of crockery, pots etc

It's black over Bills Mothers - There's dark clouds over there (nobody knows who Bill is, let alone his mother)

I'm going to turn my bike around - going for a wee

Mysen - myself

Put twood intoil - close the door

Art a balmpot - you're silly

Be said - that's enough

I'm so nesh - I'm cold

Teggies - teeth

Manny - angry

Mardy - childish

Wobbie - wasp

Spidge - chewing gum

Dunna Wittle - don't worry about it

Winder bottom - window sill

Bobby off - leave in a hurry

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CherylParry
CherylParry4 months ago

Haha, I wouldn't have a clue what they're talking about 😂

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PhilipMarc
PhilipMarc4 months ago

Good thing you translated it. lol

There's a lot of English slangs that I just don't get and have to search for its meaning. I'm more used to EN-US, to be honest.

By the way, just looked up "chuffed to bits" as that was another I read somewhere.

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joannecroston
joannecroston
Original Poster
4 months ago

Love all these. I'm a bit further north so I've not heard of all of these.

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Dilligaf
Dilligaf4 months ago

CherylParry exactly, I reckon I could understand Arabic easier than I can Derbyshire, I love it, just not when they call me duck

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Dilligaf
Dilligaf4 months ago

Rockman chuffed to bits is a very southern saying, that or chuffed to little mint balls!!!

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joannecroston
joannecroston
Original Poster
4 months ago

Dilligaf we say chuffed to bits up here a lot. But never heard of chuffed to little mint balls 😂

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Dilligaf
Dilligaf4 months ago

joannecroston I've only ever heard it 'darn sarf' glad it is up here, I might have to move further north to hear it 😆

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KirstyW
KirstyW4 months ago

In the South West we say Where is it to? Where are you going to? We add to for some reason when it isn't needed, and older women will call me maid 😂

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Lynibis
Lynibis4 months ago

Image

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CherylParry
CherylParry4 months ago

I'm from Wales and I say breakfast, dinner and tea. But in Wales a bread roll IS a bap !

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joannecroston
joannecroston
Original Poster
4 months ago

Haha we have had so many debates about this I call it a barm, my other half calls it a roll. And when it comes to a baguette he calls it a bap. Very confusing 😂

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Janhrrs
Janhrrs4 months ago

I'm from London and my ex was Irish and he used to call the end slice of bread 'the heel', people were also 'egyts' at times, we moved up north and everyone referred to children as bairns. Moved to Dorset and people were 'led in bed' instead of lying in bed and now I'm in Somerset married to a Somerset man and everyone seems to say Gert instead of great, 'alright me luver',and 'where are you to?' I love all the different expressions.

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Dilligaf
Dilligaf4 months ago

Bobby in Supernatural called everyone ijits, loved the way he said it. I was in the Navy in the South West and had forgotten gert and alright me luver, happy memories

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Dilligaf
Dilligaf4 months ago

Without going in to the bread debate, I was asked to go and get a chip teacake from a chip shop for a friend from Manchester and I thought she was the weirdest person ever, who puts chips in to a piece of bread with currants and spices? How does a piece of circular bread become a cake and where does the tea come in to it?

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joannecroston
joannecroston
Original Poster
4 months ago

I'm from greater manchester and to me a teacake is also the bun with currants in, we'd call it a chip barm

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Dilligaf
Dilligaf4 months ago

joannecroston this was Accrington, though someone in Warrington says it too

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MrsCraig
MrsCraig4 months ago

I'm from Scotland and we have loads. My husband is from Northern Ireland and we have both learnt each others phrases and use them regularly. There are still a few that I say and he looks really confused. It confuses my mother in law.

Never call a roll anything but a bap in front of my husband, he will spend ages proving you are wrong! I say this from experience.

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